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#MakePeopleCount
ABOUT

Sexual violence is happening here in Hong Kong. It happens all around us with the majority of cases by perpetrators the victim knows.

At The Women’s Foundation, we know the numbers.

4, 5

We also know these are more than just numbers, they are people. People we all know.

Yet it’s an issue that we don’t discuss; it’s a violation that we fail to manage, whose perpetrators too often go free and whose victims are too often unsupported. It’s an issue we aren’t doing enough to address. There’s so much we need to do to educate people, to break taboos, to change policies, to provide better support, to improve legal protection. But first we simply have to make this issue a priority.

Numbers can blind us. Statistics may shock us, but it is only when we see them as real people that we can be spurred into action.

Know the numbers, but let’s make people count. #makepeoplecount


REFERENCES

1 Women’s Coalition on Equal Opportunities, “Survey on Hong Kong Women’s Experience of Sexual Violence”, 2013

2 Ibid



5 Women’s Coalition on Equal Opportunities, “Survey on Hong Kong Women’s Experience of Sexual Violence”, 2013

DEFINITIONS


Sexual violence 1

Any sexual act, attempt to obtain a sexual act, unwanted sexual comments or advances, or acts to traffic, or otherwise directed against a person’s sexuality using coercion, by any person regardless of their relationship to the victim, in any setting including but not limited to home and work.


Rape 2

Penetration – even if slightly – of any body part of a person who does not consent with a sexual organ and/or the invasion of the genital or anal opening of a person who does not consent with any object or body part.


Sexual Assault 3

Sexual activity with another person who does not consent. It is a violation of bodily integrity and sexual autonomy and is broader than narrower conceptions of “rape”, especially because (a) it may be committed by other means than force or violence, and (b) it does not necessarily entail penetration.


Sexual Harassment 4

Any person who makes unwelcome sexual advances, or unwelcome request for sexual favors, to another person; or someone who engages in other unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature in relation to that other person. It also includes any person – alone or with others - who engages in conduct of a sexual nature which creates a hostile or intimidating environment for another person.


Cybersexual Violence 5

The use of social media and communication technologies for any of the following: sexual comments or advances; attempts to obtain a sexual act; unwanted sexual acts and / or sexual coercion.


Upskirting 6

A colloquial term referring to the action of placing equipment such as a camera or mobile phone beneath a person’s clothing to take a voyeuristic photograph without their permission.

REFERENCES


1 World Health Organization and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Preventing intimate partner and sexual violence against women: taking action and generating evidence, 2010.

2 United Nations, Glossary on Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, Second Edition, 2017

3 Ibid

4 Equal Opportunities Commission, Preventing and Dealing with Sexual Harassment.

5 University of Ottawa, Sexual Violence Support & Prevention

6 The Crown Prosecution Service, Voyeurism
RESOURCES
General Information
What is the difference between sexual harassment and sexual assault?
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What is the legal definition of sexual harassment in Hong Kong?
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What does sexual harassment look like?
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What is covered under the Hong Kong Sex Discrimination Ordinance?
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What is the difference between indecent assault and rape?
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Individuals
What can you do if you experience sexual violence?
Call Mira – a confidential telephone helpline for ethnic minority women and girls with services offered in English, Hindi and Urdu.
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CEASE Crisis Centre – 24 hour hotline
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The Equal Opportunities Commission website has information on preventing and dealing with sexual harassment.
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Family Crisis Support Centre – Caritas
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Harmony House - 24 hour domestic violence hotline
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Hong Kong Police
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Po Leung Kok – 24 hour hotline
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Rainlily – Operating Hours: Mon-Fri 0900-2200 & Sat 0900-1300
More
Social Welfare Department’s Integrated Services Centres
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How can you look after your mental well-being after experiencing sexual violence?

A few Mental Health Services are listed below:
Integrated Community Centres for Mental Wellness
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List of private psychiatrists practicing in Hong Kong
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ReSource The Counselling Centre
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Social Welfare Department’s Integrated Services Centres
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LeanIn offers this self-care guide for people who have been sexually harassed
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How can you report sexual harassment in Hong Kong?
The Sex Discrimination Ordinance explains your rights and tells you how to report sexual harassment
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Where can you get legal advice after experiencing sexual violence?
Please contact this list of lawyers [PDF]
What should you do if you witness sexual harassment?

There is growing evidence that active bystanders, or witnesses to sexual harassment, play a powerful role in stopping harassment from taking place or escalating and in supporting the victim. These resources tell you more.
How colleagues can stop sexual harassment in the workplace
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How leadership and HR departments can facilitate reporting and prevention of sexual harassment in the workplace and bystander training
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How to Be a (Good) Bystander
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How can you support someone who has experienced sexual violence?
Rainlily’s Support Information
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Information for Companies
Why preventing and dealing with sexual harassment is so important
Here is the business case for preventing sexual harassment in the workplace, including direct and indirect costs:
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How to create a sexual harassment-free workplace culture
Calling All CEOs: Corporate Culture is Your Best Defense Against Sexual Harassment Claims
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Sexual Harassment Training Doesn’t Work. But Some Things Do.
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7 Things the #MeToo movement has taught compliance
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Toolkits to support an effective sexual harassment policy
Navexglobal Sexual Harassment Prevention Resources
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UN Handbook on Addressing Violence and Harassment against Women in the World of Work
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Information for SMEs
Equal Opportunities Commission SME resources
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Dealing with sexual harassment when your company is too small to have HR:
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Requirements of Hong Kong employers
Code of Practice on Employment under the Sex Discrimination Ordinance
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What can employers do to comply with the anti-discrimination law of Hong Kong
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Zero Tolerance - Getting tough on sexual harassment
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Further reading – APAC workplace sexual harassment policy comparisons
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Other useful resources
What else do you need?

If you still have questions, get in touch at makepeoplecount@twfhk.org.

TWF is advocating for a safer city, and one that is more supportive of people who experience sexual violence. See our action points here.

Know the numbers, but let’s make people count. #makepeoplecount

Thank you for your support

We’re very grateful to you and everyone else who has supported our #makepeoplecount campaign. A special thanks goes to:

PR Agency


Social Media Partner


Academic Partner


Creative Agency


Media Partner


Supporting Organisations & Groups


A warm thank you to the director of this video Yan Yan Mak and cinematographer Fisher Yu Jing-Ping for their invaluable support.